A baby who can self-soothe will fall asleep on their own @ClevelandClinic ❤️

Cleveland Clinic

@ClevelandClinic

·

A baby who can self-soothe will fall asleep on their own and play calmly without your intervention. It’s a process, and a skill, that will help throughout their lives. Follow these tips to get started.

It’s naptime — thank goodness. But your baby isn’t having it. They cry. They fuss. So, you bounce them, rock them or even drive around town until they fall asleep.

It’s the question on the top of your mind (and you’re not alone): When — and how — will my baby learn to self-soothe and calm down without so much effort?

Pediatrician Matthew Badgett, MD, answers this important question, and shares ways to help your baby learn to self-soothe. 

Why is self-soothing important? 

When your baby self-soothes, they can calm down on their own and they:  

  • Fall asleep without your help. 
  • Fall back asleep if they wake up in the middle of a nap or during the night. 
  • Sit or play calmly by themselves.  

But self-soothing isn’t just for little ones. It’s an important skill throughout your life. Whether you realize it or not, you use your own self-soothing methods to feel better when you’re stressed or anxious. 

“Self-soothing is a way of regulating your emotions,” Dr. Badgett explains. “Babies might suck their thumb or hold a stuffed animal. Adults might listen to music, take a walk or do yoga. The type of self-soothing you use changes throughout your life, but it’s a key part of your emotional health.” 

When can my baby learn to self-soothe? 

Every exhausted parent wants to know: When will my baby lie in their crib and drift off to sleep without my help? Or When can I put them in their bouncy seat for five minutes without screams of protest? 

“In general, don’t try to teach your baby to self-soothe before they are 3 months old,” advises Dr. Badgett. “Newborns need you to help soothe them because they don’t have the ability to control their emotions. Learning emotional control is a process that takes years, so don’t expect too much from an infant or toddler.”  

And self-soothing is a gradual process — not a switch you can flip. “Self-soothing is really co-soothing because the parent is still involved,” says Dr. Badgett. “Your baby plays a more active role in soothing, but you set them up for success. You figure out how your baby can calm down with less of your help.” 

Self-soothing tips and techniques 

If your baby is past the newborn stage but still cries relentlessly when you put them down, there is hope. These tips can help your baby gain self-soothing skills: 

1. Meet your baby’s needs first 

Before you assume that your baby is just cranky, review their list of needs. Your baby won’t be able to self-soothe if: 

  • Their diaper is wet or soiled. 
  • Their clothing is too hot or too cold for the environment. 
  • There are too many distractions in the room, like a noisy TV or other children. 
  • They have gas or need to be burped. 
  • They’re hungry or thirsty. 
  • They’re overtired.  

After you’ve ruled out those issues, move on to the next steps.

2. Set a schedule 

Babies love routine. Try to put your baby to bed at the same time every day. Don’t skip naps or keep your baby up late. A schedule keeps them from becoming overtired — that’s when any hope of self-soothing goes out the window.  

“If your baby goes to bed at the same times each day, their body clock will get used to it,” Dr. Badgett notes. “Then, they will start to feel sleepy right at naptime or bedtime. Babies that are drowsy, but not exhausted, are better able to fall asleep on their own.” 

3. Use white noise 

The sound of a fan or a white noise machine can be music to your baby’s ears. “Many babies prefer a steady sound over a perfectly quiet room,” Dr. Badgett says. “It helps drown out other sounds that could startle them, and it has a calming effect.” 

Turn on the white noise machine when it’s bedtime. This can serve as a cue for your baby to learn when it’s time for dreamland. 

4. Stay close without picking them up 

After you place your baby in their crib or seat, don’t leave right away.  

“If you give your baby some attention without holding them, they learn that being put down isn’t a bad thing,” Dr. Badgett explains. “Talk to them, or gently put your hand on their belly. After a few minutes, calmly leave the room.” 

5. Try a pacifier  

Pacifiers are a useful tool for babies under the age of 1. But use caution. It can be hard to take the paci away from a baby who can’t calm down without it.  

“Pacifiers help young babies learn to self-soothe before they learn other techniques,” Dr. Badgett says. “But limit pacifier use to naptime and bedtime. Use them with other methods, like white noise and a consistent routine. That way, your baby won’t learn to rely on the pacifier alone.” 

6. Wean them off feeding to sleep 

It’s normal for young babies to fall asleep at the bottle or breast. But as your baby grows, they need to learn other ways to drift off. 

“Don’t feed your older baby right at naptime with the sole purpose of getting them to sleep,” Dr. Badgett suggests. “They might end up overeating or relying on the nipple even when they’re already full.”  

You can avoid the feed-to-sleep method if you: 

  • Stop feeding if you see your baby getting sleepy. 
  • Gently burp your baby to wake them up a little if they fell asleep feeding. Then, use the other self-soothing techniques to help them calm back down. 

With a little persistence, perseverance and patience on your end, your little one could be self-soothing to sleep in no time.

6 Ways To Help Your Baby Self-Soothe and Find Calm @ClevelandClinic ❤️

Cleveland Clinic

@ClevelandClinic

·

A baby who can self-soothe will fall asleep on their own and play calmly without your intervention. It’s a process, and a skill, that will help throughout their lives. Follow these tips to get started.

It’s naptime — thank goodness. But your baby isn’t having it. They cry. They fuss. So, you bounce them, rock them or even drive around town until they fall asleep.

It’s the question on the top of your mind (and you’re not alone): When — and how — will my baby learn to self-soothe and calm down without so much effort?

Pediatrician Matthew Badgett, MD, answers this important question, and shares ways to help your baby learn to self-soothe. 

Why is self-soothing important? 

When your baby self-soothes, they can calm down on their own and they:  

  • Fall asleep without your help. 
  • Fall back asleep if they wake up in the middle of a nap or during the night. 
  • Sit or play calmly by themselves.  

But self-soothing isn’t just for little ones. It’s an important skill throughout your life. Whether you realize it or not, you use your own self-soothing methods to feel better when you’re stressed or anxious. 

“Self-soothing is a way of regulating your emotions,” Dr. Badgett explains. “Babies might suck their thumb or hold a stuffed animal. Adults might listen to music, take a walk or do yoga. The type of self-soothing you use changes throughout your life, but it’s a key part of your emotional health.” 

When can my baby learn to self-soothe? 

Every exhausted parent wants to know: When will my baby lie in their crib and drift off to sleep without my help? Or When can I put them in their bouncy seat for five minutes without screams of protest? 

“In general, don’t try to teach your baby to self-soothe before they are 3 months old,” advises Dr. Badgett. “Newborns need you to help soothe them because they don’t have the ability to control their emotions. Learning emotional control is a process that takes years, so don’t expect too much from an infant or toddler.”  

And self-soothing is a gradual process — not a switch you can flip. “Self-soothing is really co-soothing because the parent is still involved,” says Dr. Badgett. “Your baby plays a more active role in soothing, but you set them up for success. You figure out how your baby can calm down with less of your help.” 

Self-soothing tips and techniques 

If your baby is past the newborn stage but still cries relentlessly when you put them down, there is hope. These tips can help your baby gain self-soothing skills: 

1. Meet your baby’s needs first 

Before you assume that your baby is just cranky, review their list of needs. Your baby won’t be able to self-soothe if: 

  • Their diaper is wet or soiled. 
  • Their clothing is too hot or too cold for the environment. 
  • There are too many distractions in the room, like a noisy TV or other children. 
  • They have gas or need to be burped. 
  • They’re hungry or thirsty. 
  • They’re overtired.  

After you’ve ruled out those issues, move on to the next steps.

2. Set a schedule 

Babies love routine. Try to put your baby to bed at the same time every day. Don’t skip naps or keep your baby up late. A schedule keeps them from becoming overtired — that’s when any hope of self-soothing goes out the window.  

“If your baby goes to bed at the same times each day, their body clock will get used to it,” Dr. Badgett notes. “Then, they will start to feel sleepy right at naptime or bedtime. Babies that are drowsy, but not exhausted, are better able to fall asleep on their own.” 

3. Use white noise 

The sound of a fan or a white noise machine can be music to your baby’s ears. “Many babies prefer a steady sound over a perfectly quiet room,” Dr. Badgett says. “It helps drown out other sounds that could startle them, and it has a calming effect.” 

Turn on the white noise machine when it’s bedtime. This can serve as a cue for your baby to learn when it’s time for dreamland. 

4. Stay close without picking them up 

After you place your baby in their crib or seat, don’t leave right away.  

“If you give your baby some attention without holding them, they learn that being put down isn’t a bad thing,” Dr. Badgett explains. “Talk to them, or gently put your hand on their belly. After a few minutes, calmly leave the room.” 

5. Try a pacifier  

Pacifiers are a useful tool for babies under the age of 1. But use caution. It can be hard to take the paci away from a baby who can’t calm down without it.  

“Pacifiers help young babies learn to self-soothe before they learn other techniques,” Dr. Badgett says. “But limit pacifier use to naptime and bedtime. Use them with other methods, like white noise and a consistent routine. That way, your baby won’t learn to rely on the pacifier alone.” 

6. Wean them off feeding to sleep 

It’s normal for young babies to fall asleep at the bottle or breast. But as your baby grows, they need to learn other ways to drift off. 

“Don’t feed your older baby right at naptime with the sole purpose of getting them to sleep,” Dr. Badgett suggests. “They might end up overeating or relying on the nipple even when they’re already full.”  

You can avoid the feed-to-sleep method if you: 

  • Stop feeding if you see your baby getting sleepy. 
  • Gently burp your baby to wake them up a little if they fell asleep feeding. Then, use the other self-soothing techniques to help them calm back down. 

With a little persistence, perseverance and patience on your end, your little one could be self-soothing to sleep in no time.

Got a sore throat and cough? Research shows that honey can help soothe irritation thanks to its antimicrobial and anti-inflammation properties. @ClevelandClinic

Honey for Your Sore Throat and Cough

The natural at-home remedy can soothe irritation and decrease inflammation

t feels faint at first — there’s a little tickle or scratch at the back of your throat.

Then, it hurts or even burns when you swallow.

Ugh, you’ve got a sore throat, and a cough isn’t far behind.

You’re taking cough syrup and lozenges in an attempt to get some relief. But what about using honey for sore throat symptoms? Does this natural home remedy actually work to soothe a sore throat and cough?

Yes, says family medicine physician Elizabeth Rainbolt, MD.

Dr. Rainbolt explains how honey works and when and how to use it.

Honey for a sore throat

It’s common to get a sore throat every now and then. You may have a sore throat due to the following:

In addition to having other symptoms like nasal congestion, fatigue and fever, you may develop a cough.

Honey has a long history of being used as a natural remedy. And one remedy is to soothe sore throats and help alleviate a cough.

Research shows that honey has some antimicrobial and anti-inflammation properties. Honey can help by decreasing inflammation and irritation in your throat,” explains Dr. Rainbolt. “Another study shows that honey may reduce mucus secretion. So, you can use honey for cough symptoms as well, whether it’s a wet or dry cough.”

Is it safe for children?

Giving honey to a child under 1-year-old isn’t recommended, warns Dr. Rainbolt.

“There’s concern for an infant botulism, a serious illness that’s caused by Clostridium botulinum,” she continues. “While it’s a rare occurrence, honey can contain spores that cause botulism. It attacks the body’s nervous system and children under one are more vulnerable.”

How to use for a sore throat

Most sore throats tend to get better within a week, but during that time, adults can take a spoonful (about 1 teaspoon) of honey for a cough and sore throat.

You can also dilute half a teaspoon to 1 teaspoon of honey in warm water or tea. This method is also recommended for children older than 1.

“You can use it with any kind of herbal tea or warm water with lemon juice, which can be soothing as well,” says Dr. Rainbolt.

So, how often can you use this home remedy? Dr. Rainbolt recommends using honey no more than four or five times a day.

And part of that reasoning is that honey does contain sugar.

“If you’re concerned about your sugar intake, then I recommend using honey more sparingly,” she says. “I would just use it at night to give you some relief before you go to bed.”

And can you use both honey and traditional cold medicine?

Yes, says Dr. Rainbolt.

“If it seems like the honey isn’t helping on its own, then you can certainly do both honey and medication, if medicine is something that you are able to take,” she notes.

Is honey safe to use?

Honey can be a helpful tool for those who can’t take traditional cold medications — for example, children under 6 years old or individuals with health conditions like high blood pressure or cardiovascular disease.

Overall, honey can be a good way to help soothe your sore throat and cough. It doesn’t come with some of the side effects that over-the-counter medications have like drowsiness.

So, can you just buy any honey you see on the grocery store shelf?

Yes, but you might want to make sure it’s been pasteurized. The pasteurization process removes any crystallization and unwanted yeast. It also improves honey’s texture and color, while extending its shelf life.

Dr. Rainbolt also mentions that some people think using local honey, which tends to be unpasteurized or raw, can come with extra benefits.

“There’s a thought that if you use local honey, you are exposed to some of the area’s natural allergens in a positive way,” she explains. “The idea is that it will help with allergies you have.”

The next time your throat starts to tickle, reach for honey and see if it helps.

“Think of honey as a first line of defense for those over 1 year old,” says Dr. Rainbolt. “Honey is something that pretty much everyone can try. And it’s been shown to work as well as some cough suppressant medications. It’s a nice alternative.”

Exhausted? 6 Ways To Help Your Baby Self-Soothe and Find Calm @ClevelandClinic ❤️

Cleveland Clinic

@ClevelandClinic

·

A baby who can self-soothe will fall asleep on their own and play calmly without your intervention. It’s a process, and a skill, that will help throughout their lives. Follow these tips to get started.

It’s naptime — thank goodness. But your baby isn’t having it. They cry. They fuss. So, you bounce them, rock them or even drive around town until they fall asleep.

It’s the question on the top of your mind (and you’re not alone): When — and how — will my baby learn to self-soothe and calm down without so much effort?

Pediatrician Matthew Badgett, MD, answers this important question, and shares ways to help your baby learn to self-soothe. 

Why is self-soothing important? 

When your baby self-soothes, they can calm down on their own and they:  

  • Fall asleep without your help. 
  • Fall back asleep if they wake up in the middle of a nap or during the night. 
  • Sit or play calmly by themselves.  

But self-soothing isn’t just for little ones. It’s an important skill throughout your life. Whether you realize it or not, you use your own self-soothing methods to feel better when you’re stressed or anxious. 

“Self-soothing is a way of regulating your emotions,” Dr. Badgett explains. “Babies might suck their thumb or hold a stuffed animal. Adults might listen to music, take a walk or do yoga. The type of self-soothing you use changes throughout your life, but it’s a key part of your emotional health.” 

When can my baby learn to self-soothe? 

Every exhausted parent wants to know: When will my baby lie in their crib and drift off to sleep without my help? Or When can I put them in their bouncy seat for five minutes without screams of protest? 

“In general, don’t try to teach your baby to self-soothe before they are 3 months old,” advises Dr. Badgett. “Newborns need you to help soothe them because they don’t have the ability to control their emotions. Learning emotional control is a process that takes years, so don’t expect too much from an infant or toddler.”  

And self-soothing is a gradual process — not a switch you can flip. “Self-soothing is really co-soothing because the parent is still involved,” says Dr. Badgett. “Your baby plays a more active role in soothing, but you set them up for success. You figure out how your baby can calm down with less of your help.” 

Self-soothing tips and techniques 

If your baby is past the newborn stage but still cries relentlessly when you put them down, there is hope. These tips can help your baby gain self-soothing skills: 

1. Meet your baby’s needs first 

Before you assume that your baby is just cranky, review their list of needs. Your baby won’t be able to self-soothe if: 

  • Their diaper is wet or soiled. 
  • Their clothing is too hot or too cold for the environment. 
  • There are too many distractions in the room, like a noisy TV or other children. 
  • They have gas or need to be burped. 
  • They’re hungry or thirsty. 
  • They’re overtired.  

After you’ve ruled out those issues, move on to the next steps.

2. Set a schedule 

Babies love routine. Try to put your baby to bed at the same time every day. Don’t skip naps or keep your baby up late. A schedule keeps them from becoming overtired — that’s when any hope of self-soothing goes out the window.  

“If your baby goes to bed at the same times each day, their body clock will get used to it,” Dr. Badgett notes. “Then, they will start to feel sleepy right at naptime or bedtime. Babies that are drowsy, but not exhausted, are better able to fall asleep on their own.” 

3. Use white noise 

The sound of a fan or a white noise machine can be music to your baby’s ears. “Many babies prefer a steady sound over a perfectly quiet room,” Dr. Badgett says. “It helps drown out other sounds that could startle them, and it has a calming effect.” 

Turn on the white noise machine when it’s bedtime. This can serve as a cue for your baby to learn when it’s time for dreamland. 

4. Stay close without picking them up 

After you place your baby in their crib or seat, don’t leave right away.  

“If you give your baby some attention without holding them, they learn that being put down isn’t a bad thing,” Dr. Badgett explains. “Talk to them, or gently put your hand on their belly. After a few minutes, calmly leave the room.” 

5. Try a pacifier  

Pacifiers are a useful tool for babies under the age of 1. But use caution. It can be hard to take the paci away from a baby who can’t calm down without it.  

“Pacifiers help young babies learn to self-soothe before they learn other techniques,” Dr. Badgett says. “But limit pacifier use to naptime and bedtime. Use them with other methods, like white noise and a consistent routine. That way, your baby won’t learn to rely on the pacifier alone.” 

6. Wean them off feeding to sleep 

It’s normal for young babies to fall asleep at the bottle or breast. But as your baby grows, they need to learn other ways to drift off. 

“Don’t feed your older baby right at naptime with the sole purpose of getting them to sleep,” Dr. Badgett suggests. “They might end up overeating or relying on the nipple even when they’re already full.”  

You can avoid the feed-to-sleep method if you: 

  • Stop feeding if you see your baby getting sleepy. 
  • Gently burp your baby to wake them up a little if they fell asleep feeding. Then, use the other self-soothing techniques to help them calm back down. 

With a little persistence, perseverance and patience on your end, your little one could be self-soothing to sleep in no time.

Exhausted? 6 Ways To Help Your Baby Self-Soothe and Find Calm @ClevelandClinic ❤️

Cleveland Clinic

@ClevelandClinic

·

A baby who can self-soothe will fall asleep on their own and play calmly without your intervention. It’s a process, and a skill, that will help throughout their lives. Follow these tips to get started.

It’s naptime — thank goodness. But your baby isn’t having it. They cry. They fuss. So, you bounce them, rock them or even drive around town until they fall asleep.

It’s the question on the top of your mind (and you’re not alone): When — and how — will my baby learn to self-soothe and calm down without so much effort?

Pediatrician Matthew Badgett, MD, answers this important question, and shares ways to help your baby learn to self-soothe. 

Why is self-soothing important? 

When your baby self-soothes, they can calm down on their own and they:  

  • Fall asleep without your help. 
  • Fall back asleep if they wake up in the middle of a nap or during the night. 
  • Sit or play calmly by themselves.  

But self-soothing isn’t just for little ones. It’s an important skill throughout your life. Whether you realize it or not, you use your own self-soothing methods to feel better when you’re stressed or anxious. 

“Self-soothing is a way of regulating your emotions,” Dr. Badgett explains. “Babies might suck their thumb or hold a stuffed animal. Adults might listen to music, take a walk or do yoga. The type of self-soothing you use changes throughout your life, but it’s a key part of your emotional health.” 

When can my baby learn to self-soothe? 

Every exhausted parent wants to know: When will my baby lie in their crib and drift off to sleep without my help? Or When can I put them in their bouncy seat for five minutes without screams of protest? 

“In general, don’t try to teach your baby to self-soothe before they are 3 months old,” advises Dr. Badgett. “Newborns need you to help soothe them because they don’t have the ability to control their emotions. Learning emotional control is a process that takes years, so don’t expect too much from an infant or toddler.”  

And self-soothing is a gradual process — not a switch you can flip. “Self-soothing is really co-soothing because the parent is still involved,” says Dr. Badgett. “Your baby plays a more active role in soothing, but you set them up for success. You figure out how your baby can calm down with less of your help.” 

Self-soothing tips and techniques 

If your baby is past the newborn stage but still cries relentlessly when you put them down, there is hope. These tips can help your baby gain self-soothing skills: 

1. Meet your baby’s needs first 

Before you assume that your baby is just cranky, review their list of needs. Your baby won’t be able to self-soothe if: 

  • Their diaper is wet or soiled. 
  • Their clothing is too hot or too cold for the environment. 
  • There are too many distractions in the room, like a noisy TV or other children. 
  • They have gas or need to be burped. 
  • They’re hungry or thirsty. 
  • They’re overtired.  

After you’ve ruled out those issues, move on to the next steps.

2. Set a schedule 

Babies love routine. Try to put your baby to bed at the same time every day. Don’t skip naps or keep your baby up late. A schedule keeps them from becoming overtired — that’s when any hope of self-soothing goes out the window.  

“If your baby goes to bed at the same times each day, their body clock will get used to it,” Dr. Badgett notes. “Then, they will start to feel sleepy right at naptime or bedtime. Babies that are drowsy, but not exhausted, are better able to fall asleep on their own.” 

3. Use white noise 

The sound of a fan or a white noise machine can be music to your baby’s ears. “Many babies prefer a steady sound over a perfectly quiet room,” Dr. Badgett says. “It helps drown out other sounds that could startle them, and it has a calming effect.” 

Turn on the white noise machine when it’s bedtime. This can serve as a cue for your baby to learn when it’s time for dreamland. 

4. Stay close without picking them up 

After you place your baby in their crib or seat, don’t leave right away.  

“If you give your baby some attention without holding them, they learn that being put down isn’t a bad thing,” Dr. Badgett explains. “Talk to them, or gently put your hand on their belly. After a few minutes, calmly leave the room.” 

5. Try a pacifier  

Pacifiers are a useful tool for babies under the age of 1. But use caution. It can be hard to take the paci away from a baby who can’t calm down without it.  

“Pacifiers help young babies learn to self-soothe before they learn other techniques,” Dr. Badgett says. “But limit pacifier use to naptime and bedtime. Use them with other methods, like white noise and a consistent routine. That way, your baby won’t learn to rely on the pacifier alone.” 

6. Wean them off feeding to sleep 

It’s normal for young babies to fall asleep at the bottle or breast. But as your baby grows, they need to learn other ways to drift off. 

“Don’t feed your older baby right at naptime with the sole purpose of getting them to sleep,” Dr. Badgett suggests. “They might end up overeating or relying on the nipple even when they’re already full.”  

You can avoid the feed-to-sleep method if you: 

  • Stop feeding if you see your baby getting sleepy. 
  • Gently burp your baby to wake them up a little if they fell asleep feeding. Then, use the other self-soothing techniques to help them calm back down. 

With a little persistence, perseverance and patience on your end, your little one could be self-soothing to sleep in no time.

Exhausted? 6 Ways To Help Your Baby Self-Soothe and Find Calm @ClevelandClinic ❤️

Cleveland Clinic

@ClevelandClinic

·

A baby who can self-soothe will fall asleep on their own and play calmly without your intervention. It’s a process, and a skill, that will help throughout their lives. Follow these tips to get started.

It’s naptime — thank goodness. But your baby isn’t having it. They cry. They fuss. So, you bounce them, rock them or even drive around town until they fall asleep.

It’s the question on the top of your mind (and you’re not alone): When — and how — will my baby learn to self-soothe and calm down without so much effort?

Pediatrician Matthew Badgett, MD, answers this important question, and shares ways to help your baby learn to self-soothe. 

Why is self-soothing important? 

When your baby self-soothes, they can calm down on their own and they:  

  • Fall asleep without your help. 
  • Fall back asleep if they wake up in the middle of a nap or during the night. 
  • Sit or play calmly by themselves.  

But self-soothing isn’t just for little ones. It’s an important skill throughout your life. Whether you realize it or not, you use your own self-soothing methods to feel better when you’re stressed or anxious. 

“Self-soothing is a way of regulating your emotions,” Dr. Badgett explains. “Babies might suck their thumb or hold a stuffed animal. Adults might listen to music, take a walk or do yoga. The type of self-soothing you use changes throughout your life, but it’s a key part of your emotional health.” 

When can my baby learn to self-soothe? 

Every exhausted parent wants to know: When will my baby lie in their crib and drift off to sleep without my help? Or When can I put them in their bouncy seat for five minutes without screams of protest? 

“In general, don’t try to teach your baby to self-soothe before they are 3 months old,” advises Dr. Badgett. “Newborns need you to help soothe them because they don’t have the ability to control their emotions. Learning emotional control is a process that takes years, so don’t expect too much from an infant or toddler.”  

And self-soothing is a gradual process — not a switch you can flip. “Self-soothing is really co-soothing because the parent is still involved,” says Dr. Badgett. “Your baby plays a more active role in soothing, but you set them up for success. You figure out how your baby can calm down with less of your help.” 

Self-soothing tips and techniques 

If your baby is past the newborn stage but still cries relentlessly when you put them down, there is hope. These tips can help your baby gain self-soothing skills: 

1. Meet your baby’s needs first 

Before you assume that your baby is just cranky, review their list of needs. Your baby won’t be able to self-soothe if: 

  • Their diaper is wet or soiled. 
  • Their clothing is too hot or too cold for the environment. 
  • There are too many distractions in the room, like a noisy TV or other children. 
  • They have gas or need to be burped. 
  • They’re hungry or thirsty. 
  • They’re overtired.  

After you’ve ruled out those issues, move on to the next steps.

2. Set a schedule 

Babies love routine. Try to put your baby to bed at the same time every day. Don’t skip naps or keep your baby up late. A schedule keeps them from becoming overtired — that’s when any hope of self-soothing goes out the window.  

“If your baby goes to bed at the same times each day, their body clock will get used to it,” Dr. Badgett notes. “Then, they will start to feel sleepy right at naptime or bedtime. Babies that are drowsy, but not exhausted, are better able to fall asleep on their own.” 

3. Use white noise 

The sound of a fan or a white noise machine can be music to your baby’s ears. “Many babies prefer a steady sound over a perfectly quiet room,” Dr. Badgett says. “It helps drown out other sounds that could startle them, and it has a calming effect.” 

Turn on the white noise machine when it’s bedtime. This can serve as a cue for your baby to learn when it’s time for dreamland. 

4. Stay close without picking them up 

After you place your baby in their crib or seat, don’t leave right away.  

“If you give your baby some attention without holding them, they learn that being put down isn’t a bad thing,” Dr. Badgett explains. “Talk to them, or gently put your hand on their belly. After a few minutes, calmly leave the room.” 

5. Try a pacifier  

Pacifiers are a useful tool for babies under the age of 1. But use caution. It can be hard to take the paci away from a baby who can’t calm down without it.  

“Pacifiers help young babies learn to self-soothe before they learn other techniques,” Dr. Badgett says. “But limit pacifier use to naptime and bedtime. Use them with other methods, like white noise and a consistent routine. That way, your baby won’t learn to rely on the pacifier alone.” 

6. Wean them off feeding to sleep 

It’s normal for young babies to fall asleep at the bottle or breast. But as your baby grows, they need to learn other ways to drift off. 

“Don’t feed your older baby right at naptime with the sole purpose of getting them to sleep,” Dr. Badgett suggests. “They might end up overeating or relying on the nipple even when they’re already full.”  

You can avoid the feed-to-sleep method if you: 

  • Stop feeding if you see your baby getting sleepy. 
  • Gently burp your baby to wake them up a little if they fell asleep feeding. Then, use the other self-soothing techniques to help them calm back down. 

With a little persistence, perseverance and patience on your end, your little one could be self-soothing to sleep in no time.

Exhausted? 6 Ways To Help Your Baby Self-Soothe and Find Calm @ClevelandClinic ❤️

Cleveland Clinic

@ClevelandClinic

·

A baby who can self-soothe will fall asleep on their own and play calmly without your intervention. It’s a process, and a skill, that will help throughout their lives. Follow these tips to get started.

It’s naptime — thank goodness. But your baby isn’t having it. They cry. They fuss. So, you bounce them, rock them or even drive around town until they fall asleep.

It’s the question on the top of your mind (and you’re not alone): When — and how — will my baby learn to self-soothe and calm down without so much effort?

Pediatrician Matthew Badgett, MD, answers this important question, and shares ways to help your baby learn to self-soothe. 

Why is self-soothing important? 

When your baby self-soothes, they can calm down on their own and they:  

  • Fall asleep without your help. 
  • Fall back asleep if they wake up in the middle of a nap or during the night. 
  • Sit or play calmly by themselves.  

But self-soothing isn’t just for little ones. It’s an important skill throughout your life. Whether you realize it or not, you use your own self-soothing methods to feel better when you’re stressed or anxious. 

“Self-soothing is a way of regulating your emotions,” Dr. Badgett explains. “Babies might suck their thumb or hold a stuffed animal. Adults might listen to music, take a walk or do yoga. The type of self-soothing you use changes throughout your life, but it’s a key part of your emotional health.” 

When can my baby learn to self-soothe? 

Every exhausted parent wants to know: When will my baby lie in their crib and drift off to sleep without my help? Or When can I put them in their bouncy seat for five minutes without screams of protest? 

“In general, don’t try to teach your baby to self-soothe before they are 3 months old,” advises Dr. Badgett. “Newborns need you to help soothe them because they don’t have the ability to control their emotions. Learning emotional control is a process that takes years, so don’t expect too much from an infant or toddler.”  

And self-soothing is a gradual process — not a switch you can flip. “Self-soothing is really co-soothing because the parent is still involved,” says Dr. Badgett. “Your baby plays a more active role in soothing, but you set them up for success. You figure out how your baby can calm down with less of your help.” 

Self-soothing tips and techniques 

If your baby is past the newborn stage but still cries relentlessly when you put them down, there is hope. These tips can help your baby gain self-soothing skills: 

1. Meet your baby’s needs first 

Before you assume that your baby is just cranky, review their list of needs. Your baby won’t be able to self-soothe if: 

  • Their diaper is wet or soiled. 
  • Their clothing is too hot or too cold for the environment. 
  • There are too many distractions in the room, like a noisy TV or other children. 
  • They have gas or need to be burped. 
  • They’re hungry or thirsty. 
  • They’re overtired.  

After you’ve ruled out those issues, move on to the next steps.

2. Set a schedule 

Babies love routine. Try to put your baby to bed at the same time every day. Don’t skip naps or keep your baby up late. A schedule keeps them from becoming overtired — that’s when any hope of self-soothing goes out the window.  

“If your baby goes to bed at the same times each day, their body clock will get used to it,” Dr. Badgett notes. “Then, they will start to feel sleepy right at naptime or bedtime. Babies that are drowsy, but not exhausted, are better able to fall asleep on their own.” 

3. Use white noise 

The sound of a fan or a white noise machine can be music to your baby’s ears. “Many babies prefer a steady sound over a perfectly quiet room,” Dr. Badgett says. “It helps drown out other sounds that could startle them, and it has a calming effect.” 

Turn on the white noise machine when it’s bedtime. This can serve as a cue for your baby to learn when it’s time for dreamland. 

4. Stay close without picking them up 

After you place your baby in their crib or seat, don’t leave right away.  

“If you give your baby some attention without holding them, they learn that being put down isn’t a bad thing,” Dr. Badgett explains. “Talk to them, or gently put your hand on their belly. After a few minutes, calmly leave the room.” 

5. Try a pacifier  

Pacifiers are a useful tool for babies under the age of 1. But use caution. It can be hard to take the paci away from a baby who can’t calm down without it.  

“Pacifiers help young babies learn to self-soothe before they learn other techniques,” Dr. Badgett says. “But limit pacifier use to naptime and bedtime. Use them with other methods, like white noise and a consistent routine. That way, your baby won’t learn to rely on the pacifier alone.” 

6. Wean them off feeding to sleep 

It’s normal for young babies to fall asleep at the bottle or breast. But as your baby grows, they need to learn other ways to drift off. 

“Don’t feed your older baby right at naptime with the sole purpose of getting them to sleep,” Dr. Badgett suggests. “They might end up overeating or relying on the nipple even when they’re already full.”  

You can avoid the feed-to-sleep method if you: 

  • Stop feeding if you see your baby getting sleepy. 
  • Gently burp your baby to wake them up a little if they fell asleep feeding. Then, use the other self-soothing techniques to help them calm back down. 

With a little persistence, perseverance and patience on your end, your little one could be self-soothing to sleep in no time.

Exhausted? 6 Ways To Help Your Baby Self-Soothe and Find Calm @ClevelandClinic ❤️

Cleveland Clinic

@ClevelandClinic

·

A baby who can self-soothe will fall asleep on their own and play calmly without your intervention. It’s a process, and a skill, that will help throughout their lives. Follow these tips to get started.

It’s naptime — thank goodness. But your baby isn’t having it. They cry. They fuss. So, you bounce them, rock them or even drive around town until they fall asleep.

It’s the question on the top of your mind (and you’re not alone): When — and how — will my baby learn to self-soothe and calm down without so much effort?

Pediatrician Matthew Badgett, MD, answers this important question, and shares ways to help your baby learn to self-soothe. 

Why is self-soothing important? 

When your baby self-soothes, they can calm down on their own and they:  

  • Fall asleep without your help. 
  • Fall back asleep if they wake up in the middle of a nap or during the night. 
  • Sit or play calmly by themselves.  

But self-soothing isn’t just for little ones. It’s an important skill throughout your life. Whether you realize it or not, you use your own self-soothing methods to feel better when you’re stressed or anxious. 

“Self-soothing is a way of regulating your emotions,” Dr. Badgett explains. “Babies might suck their thumb or hold a stuffed animal. Adults might listen to music, take a walk or do yoga. The type of self-soothing you use changes throughout your life, but it’s a key part of your emotional health.” 

When can my baby learn to self-soothe? 

Every exhausted parent wants to know: When will my baby lie in their crib and drift off to sleep without my help? Or When can I put them in their bouncy seat for five minutes without screams of protest? 

“In general, don’t try to teach your baby to self-soothe before they are 3 months old,” advises Dr. Badgett. “Newborns need you to help soothe them because they don’t have the ability to control their emotions. Learning emotional control is a process that takes years, so don’t expect too much from an infant or toddler.”  

And self-soothing is a gradual process — not a switch you can flip. “Self-soothing is really co-soothing because the parent is still involved,” says Dr. Badgett. “Your baby plays a more active role in soothing, but you set them up for success. You figure out how your baby can calm down with less of your help.” 

Self-soothing tips and techniques 

If your baby is past the newborn stage but still cries relentlessly when you put them down, there is hope. These tips can help your baby gain self-soothing skills: 

1. Meet your baby’s needs first 

Before you assume that your baby is just cranky, review their list of needs. Your baby won’t be able to self-soothe if: 

  • Their diaper is wet or soiled. 
  • Their clothing is too hot or too cold for the environment. 
  • There are too many distractions in the room, like a noisy TV or other children. 
  • They have gas or need to be burped. 
  • They’re hungry or thirsty. 
  • They’re overtired.  

After you’ve ruled out those issues, move on to the next steps.

2. Set a schedule 

Babies love routine. Try to put your baby to bed at the same time every day. Don’t skip naps or keep your baby up late. A schedule keeps them from becoming overtired — that’s when any hope of self-soothing goes out the window.  

“If your baby goes to bed at the same times each day, their body clock will get used to it,” Dr. Badgett notes. “Then, they will start to feel sleepy right at naptime or bedtime. Babies that are drowsy, but not exhausted, are better able to fall asleep on their own.” 

3. Use white noise 

The sound of a fan or a white noise machine can be music to your baby’s ears. “Many babies prefer a steady sound over a perfectly quiet room,” Dr. Badgett says. “It helps drown out other sounds that could startle them, and it has a calming effect.” 

Turn on the white noise machine when it’s bedtime. This can serve as a cue for your baby to learn when it’s time for dreamland. 

4. Stay close without picking them up 

After you place your baby in their crib or seat, don’t leave right away.  

“If you give your baby some attention without holding them, they learn that being put down isn’t a bad thing,” Dr. Badgett explains. “Talk to them, or gently put your hand on their belly. After a few minutes, calmly leave the room.” 

5. Try a pacifier  

Pacifiers are a useful tool for babies under the age of 1. But use caution. It can be hard to take the paci away from a baby who can’t calm down without it.  

“Pacifiers help young babies learn to self-soothe before they learn other techniques,” Dr. Badgett says. “But limit pacifier use to naptime and bedtime. Use them with other methods, like white noise and a consistent routine. That way, your baby won’t learn to rely on the pacifier alone.” 

6. Wean them off feeding to sleep 

It’s normal for young babies to fall asleep at the bottle or breast. But as your baby grows, they need to learn other ways to drift off. 

“Don’t feed your older baby right at naptime with the sole purpose of getting them to sleep,” Dr. Badgett suggests. “They might end up overeating or relying on the nipple even when they’re already full.”  

You can avoid the feed-to-sleep method if you: 

  • Stop feeding if you see your baby getting sleepy. 
  • Gently burp your baby to wake them up a little if they fell asleep feeding. Then, use the other self-soothing techniques to help them calm back down. 

With a little persistence, perseverance and patience on your end, your little one could be self-soothing to sleep in no time.